[Written by Pauliina Hovila, Aleksi Jouttela and Marta Selva Marlasca)

Our team is composed of 3 students, respectively in the fields of Business Information Systems, ICT Engineering and a Media and Arts. We are part of a project with 3 other teams, in which we are meant to create different virtual reality experiences in several spaces of TAMK’s campus that provide some kind of information of the security issues in the campus.
Our group has focused on Service Street, space where a lot of services for students are located and that leads to other interest points such as the library or the main lobby. We wanted to bring attention to all the services that are offered, especially keeping in mind new students or international students that still haven’t been to the location or don’t know it too well and might find this information useful. To do so, we thought of highlighting some of its points of interest through floating elements to give more details about the services located there. For the security matters, we decided to include a little interactive experience in which the user can see the way to the exit routes by clicking and making appear little avatars that go to the different exit points following the exit routes connected to Service Street.

In the final result, the player can explore the Service Street space and its exit routes through teleportation, get some information of the services offered in that location and be guided to the exit routes that are connected to it with the help of little avatars that the player himself can make appear. (VR Team3)

To create the VR environment, every team used the Matterport camera provided by TAMK. This camera scans the location in 360º at each scanning point and creates a 3D mesh with photorealistic materials. The main aim of the project was for each team to experiment with the camera and the outcome files, deal with the problems that might appear and create the first version on a usable product.

Scanning Service Street presented many problems; many people passing by and furniture all around the place. The 3D mesh turned out quite messy, since some geometries weren’t properly captured. Consequently, a lot of clean up had to be done later in Blender.

The final process was to adapt the file to VR and add the interactive elements in Unity. In the final result, the player can explore the Service Street space and its exit routes through teleportation, get some information of the services offered in that location and be guided to the exit routes that are connected to it with the help of little avatars that the player himself can make appear.